ryan gosling ad infintum

Her (2013)

posted 1 week ago via ororomvnro · originally stewarter
10,134 notes

vintagegal:

Elsa Lanchester in The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)

Fun facts about “The Bride” :

  • "The Bride", the most obscure of Universal Studios’ Classic Monsters, is on screen for less than five minutes and is the only "Classic Monster" never to have killed anyone.
  • Elsa Lanchester’s shock hairdo was held in place by a wired horsehair cage.
  • Elsa Lanchester was only 5’4” but for the role was placed on stilts that made her 7’ tall. The bandages were placed so tightly on her that she was unable to move and had to be carried about the studio and fed through a straw.
  • Elsa Lanchester said that her spitting, hissing performance was inspired by the swans in Regent’s Park, London. “They’re really very nasty creatures,” she said. (x)


ladyintheattic:

i cannot believe that we were robbed of this book scene



mashamorevna:

just—space:

This view of Io was obtained during the tenth orbit of Jupiter by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft on September 19th, 1997 at a range of more than 500,000 km. Io, which is slightly larger than Earth’s moon, is the most volcanically active body in the solar system [800x800]

mashamorevna:

just—space:

This view of Io was obtained during the tenth orbit of Jupiter by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft on September 19th, 1997 at a range of more than 500,000 km. Io, which is slightly larger than Earth’s moon, is the most volcanically active body in the solar system [800x800]

posted 1 week ago via mashamorevna · originally just--space
350 notes

waitingforturnips:

Google is celebrating Diana Wynne Jones’s 80th today!

waitingforturnips:

Google is celebrating Diana Wynne Jones’s 80th today!


tobiaswraithwall:

adriofthedead:

airdotcaptain:

things that make me laugh harder than they should:

gifs made with terrible stationary parts

image

image

image


bad girlkiss kiss

posted 1 week ago via belinsky · originally lavelycode
441 notes

posted 1 week ago via belinsky · originally nicolasrefn
4,352 notes

It’s all my fault, Charles.